Air sealing rough opening during replacement install

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thomase
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Air sealing rough opening during replacement install

#1 Post by thomase » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:25 am

My house was built in '79, and based on what I've encountered during other home improvement projects, I don't expect that the gaps between the rough openings and my original wood window frames are sealed up and insulated very well. Would it be worthwhile, during a replacement window install, to have the installer remove either the interior or exterior casing in order to get access to that cavity and seal it up with non-expanding foam?

Or is it good enough to caulk the interior casing to the drywall? My wife wants to paint all of the trim white anyway (it is stained currently).

toddinmn
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Re: Air sealing rough opening during replacement install

#2 Post by toddinmn » Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:07 pm

I think it would be worth doing.
I would pull a casing off before you get bids just to have a look.

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Windows on Washington
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Re: Air sealing rough opening during replacement install

#3 Post by Windows on Washington » Wed Nov 29, 2017 2:28 pm

Keep in mind, the lack of seal there emblematic of the majority of your exterior walls.

If the trim needs replacing, you are basically not wasting money to do this, but if you are doing it to chase the efficiency dollar, you money is better spent (with regards to the additional monies for the sealing part) up in the attic with full scale air sealing and insulation.

masterext
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Re: Air sealing rough opening during replacement install

#4 Post by masterext » Wed Nov 29, 2017 3:39 pm

Bear in mind, removing interior casing could cause some damage to the interior, not major but some minor touch up may be required. This is almost always something the homeowner would need to do, not the window installer.
Removing the exterior casing can cause another set of problems. If you feel its absolutely necessary to remove the moulding, i would opt for the interior. You can do it or the window company can do it. There would definitely be an upcharge to do this; extra labor , time, and of course foam.

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