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 Post subject: Spacer
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2005 7:53 pm 

Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 1:50 am
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What's the Gorell intercept spacer made of WindDoze? Why is the SuperSpacer and TPS better? Thanks in advance.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2005 8:59 pm 

Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2005 9:22 pm
Posts: 301
Location: Peoria, IL
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The intercept spacer is metallic. Think of it this way. It get's cold outside, the outside pane of glass gets cold. The metal spacer touching that outside pane of glass gets cold, and conducts that cold to the inside pane of glass. Glass has about no insulative qualities whatsoever, so now at some level, cold is being conducted into your house. That's the theory.
Superspacer is foam and has no conductivity. TPS is an organic rubber. Unlike a metallic spacer, as the glass contracts and expands, the soft spacers move with the glass, cutting down on the possibility of seal failure over a metallic spacer.
Alot of manufacturers are using super spacer. TPS, for now, is only available on Schuco windows, but I believe others are trying to license it's use for their products.


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 Post subject: Spacer
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:15 pm 

Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 1:50 am
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Gorell calls their spacer warm edge technology. Wonder why?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 6:58 am 

Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2005 9:22 pm
Posts: 301
Location: Peoria, IL
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The intercept spacer differs from most aluminum spacers in that it's a channel shaped, insted of tube shaped, so it cuts down on conductivity.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 11:41 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 9:11 am
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"The metal spacer touching that outside pane of glass gets cold"

I do don't think this correct HipKat. The metal spacer does not touches the outside pane of glass nor the inside pane of glass.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 12:35 pm 

Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 11:20 am
Posts: 96
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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HipKat is correct. PPG the manufacturer of the Intercept spacer calls it "warm edge technology" in comparison to the old aluminum spacers. The u shaped steel is less conductive than aluminum, but it is a conductor nonetheless. Windows with metal spacer systems will have a colder temperature at the edge of the glass, and therefore be more susceptible to condensation. The metal spacers also have a much higher likelihood of seal failure as well, which really is the most likely problem to arise with thermal panes anyway. TPS (Schuco) is the best seal system out there, period. Superspacer would be second.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:27 pm 

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 9:11 am
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WindDoze, click on this link and read the second paragraphs under the three crossection pictures. The metal spacer is not touching that outside pane of glass nor the inside pane of glass.

http://www.wallsidewindows.com/intercept.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 3:41 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 3:58 pm
Posts: 1327
Location: Northern & Central Illinois, Chicago suburbs
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You give a lot of stock in that hundreth of an inch of sealant Researcher. :)
Here is a diagram of intercept similar to what you saw, and then what it really looks like. As you can see, the spacer is much closer to the glass than in the diagram.

Intercept is a great improvement over what prededed it and is acceptable in a window,... though Superspacer and TPS will do better job of keeping the inside glass warmer. TPS will also do a much better job of gas retention.


Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 4:17 pm 

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 9:11 am
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"You give a lot of stock in that hundredth of an inch of sealant Researcher."

I am not giving stock to anything, i am just saying it is not touching, but you are right it is much closer than one is lead believe.


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 Post subject: Reply
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:43 am 

Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 3:43 pm
Posts: 353
Location: Illinois
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Great pictures for showing the desiccant filled belly too. There's enough in there to absorb infiltrating moisture and hide seal failures for atleast 10-15 years. It's kind of like buying a new boat with a hull full of sponges.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:06 pm 

Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2005 9:22 pm
Posts: 301
Location: Peoria, IL
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So what you're saying is that it could still leak, but will remain hidden???


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 Post subject: Reply
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 7:41 pm 

Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 3:43 pm
Posts: 353
Location: Illinois
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Absolutely Hipcat... that's the purpose of desiccants... to hide seal failures and control moisture present in partially filled I.G. units. Research some window spacer desiccant suppliers... they brag about how their products will conceal infiltrated moisture longer than the competition and keep windows from fogging longer. SIGMA (Sealed Insulated Glass Manufacturers Association) was asked to do a study for the USDOE in 2000. They actually cut open window units that were up to 20 years old. The tested for moisture in the desiccants. The BEST units had 4%-10% failure rates. It's about time a few manufacturers invested in technology to avoid the failures instead of hiding them.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:13 pm 

Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2005 9:22 pm
Posts: 301
Location: Peoria, IL
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Very interesting.
just out of curiosity, I wonder what the failure rates for Super Spacer & TPS are??
I magine TPS is very, very low.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:49 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 9:11 am
Posts: 79
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I have heard, from more than one source, that the Argon will escape right through the glass itself over time. I am not sure, but i feel this is true. It may take a long time, but nether the less, it will happen. What do you guys have to say about this?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:50 am 
My company has been using Super Spacer for close to 9 years without a seal failure. I know other window manufacturers who use Super Spacer and none of them has ever had a seal failure either.


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