Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

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masterext
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Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#16 Post by masterext » Wed Jun 13, 2012 7:55 am

window contractors do NOT remove lead and they are not supposed to. that is lead abatement and totally different.
your contractor should be certified and properly contain any potential lead dust. if he is certified, he will know what to do.. simply ask if he is RRP certified.. if he is, it is probably fine. he could test for lead or he can just assume there is lead and follow proper procedure. most contractors i know dont test for lead but just assume its there ( whether it is or not) and simply follow proper containment.
you are not going to have a bunch of guys running around in hazmat suits..
in the bronx, there are thousands of buildings with lead, how many people actually have lead poisoning? not many.

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HomeSealed
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Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#17 Post by HomeSealed » Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:38 am

1) Any firm working on homes built prior to 1978 must be lead safe (RRP) certified, unless the homeowner has a certified negative lead test result. Some states like WI do not allow the cheaper test kits, so we just assume that each home (prior to 78) has lead, unless the HO wants to spend a few hundred dollars to get a test by a risk assessment firm.
2) The procedures are "lead safe" and deal with the containment and clean-up while working on a home that contains lead paint. It is not "abatement", although there are lead containing components that are removed such as sashes, etc. Lead abatement has different procedures and regulations.
3) The level of containment necessary depends on the type of installation. In a full frame tear-out for instance, it can be necessary to essentially quarantine each room or use a modular zip wall unit. For inserts, it is less as the debris can typically be contained to the exterior. The "haz-mat" or tyvek suits are recommended by the program, but not necessary. It falls on the choice of the installer and I have yet to see a single installer wear one.
4) A few mandatory components of the process:
-disbursement of the Renovate Right brochure
- warning signs, caution tape, and containment with plastic sheeting to meet specified procedures.
5) There is a checklist that is used on each job to insure that each procedure is followed
6) There are substantial record-keeping requirements (pictures, documents, etc)

...Hopefully that gives you some insight. Some companies try to scare you and make it seem like more than it really is, while others downplay it too much because they don't comply.

jevatelo
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:01 am

Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#18 Post by jevatelo » Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:33 pm

Thanks guys on the lead information. Everything is so much clearer now. I believe the first company was cutting corners on this and other stuff so I have 'fired' them from any consideration. On my part, I will cover beds, eating areas and common areas with plastic wrap. When the job is done I will wipe everything down and mop the entire house.

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Windows on Washington
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Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#19 Post by Windows on Washington » Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:00 am

jevatelo wrote:Thanks guys on the lead information. Everything is so much clearer now. I believe the first company was cutting corners on this and other stuff so I have 'fired' them from any consideration. On my part, I will cover beds, eating areas and common areas with plastic wrap. When the job is done I will wipe everything down and mop the entire house.
Do you need a job? :D

I could use another crew foreman with this attention to detail.

jevatelo
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:01 am

Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#20 Post by jevatelo » Mon Jun 18, 2012 12:04 pm

HomeSealed wrote:1) Any firm working on homes built prior to 1978 must be lead safe (RRP) certified, unless the homeowner has a certified negative lead test result. Some states like WI do not allow the cheaper test kits, so we just assume that each home (prior to 78) has lead, unless the HO wants to spend a few hundred dollars to get a test by a risk assessment firm.
2) The procedures are "lead safe" and deal with the containment and clean-up while working on a home that contains lead paint. It is not "abatement", although there are lead containing components that are removed such as sashes, etc. Lead abatement has different procedures and regulations.
3) The level of containment necessary depends on the type of installation. In a full frame tear-out for instance, it can be necessary to essentially quarantine each room or use a modular zip wall unit. For inserts, it is less as the debris can typically be contained to the exterior. The "haz-mat" or tyvek suits are recommended by the program, but not necessary. It falls on the choice of the installer and I have yet to see a single installer wear one.
4) A few mandatory components of the process:
-disbursement of the Renovate Right brochure
- warning signs, caution tape, and containment with plastic sheeting to meet specified procedures.
5) There is a checklist that is used on each job to insure that each procedure is followed
6) There are substantial record-keeping requirements (pictures, documents, etc)

...Hopefully that gives you some insight. Some companies try to scare you and make it seem like more than it really is, while others downplay it too much because they don't comply.
HomeSealed Thanks so much!! I used this information and compared to what the 1st dealer said. As it turns out, they WERE NOT following RRP guidelines. They simply were going to drop a couple of drop cloths and vacuum what ever debris they could. I don't even believe they going to me the brochure. Needless to say, I chose safety over price. Since then I had more quotes and both companies stressed lead protocol with me and even showed me pics of their work. The prices were slightly higher but I feel confident now with the work and install.

jevatelo
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:01 am

Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#21 Post by jevatelo » Mon Jun 18, 2012 12:07 pm

Windows on Washington wrote:
jevatelo wrote:Thanks guys on the lead information. Everything is so much clearer now. I believe the first company was cutting corners on this and other stuff so I have 'fired' them from any consideration. On my part, I will cover beds, eating areas and common areas with plastic wrap. When the job is done I will wipe everything down and mop the entire house.
Do you need a job? :D

I could use another crew foreman with this attention to detail.

Hey thanks for the offer. I actually enjoy construction work.

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Windows on Washington
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Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#22 Post by Windows on Washington » Mon Jun 18, 2012 2:51 pm

We are ready when you are.... :D

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HomeSealed
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Re: Affinity Elite Versus Okna 500

#23 Post by HomeSealed » Mon Jun 18, 2012 5:28 pm

jevatelo wrote:
HomeSealed wrote:1) Any firm working on homes built prior to 1978 must be lead safe (RRP) certified, unless the homeowner has a certified negative lead test result. Some states like WI do not allow the cheaper test kits, so we just assume that each home (prior to 78) has lead, unless the HO wants to spend a few hundred dollars to get a test by a risk assessment firm.
2) The procedures are "lead safe" and deal with the containment and clean-up while working on a home that contains lead paint. It is not "abatement", although there are lead containing components that are removed such as sashes, etc. Lead abatement has different procedures and regulations.
3) The level of containment necessary depends on the type of installation. In a full frame tear-out for instance, it can be necessary to essentially quarantine each room or use a modular zip wall unit. For inserts, it is less as the debris can typically be contained to the exterior. The "haz-mat" or tyvek suits are recommended by the program, but not necessary. It falls on the choice of the installer and I have yet to see a single installer wear one.
4) A few mandatory components of the process:
-disbursement of the Renovate Right brochure
- warning signs, caution tape, and containment with plastic sheeting to meet specified procedures.
5) There is a checklist that is used on each job to insure that each procedure is followed
6) There are substantial record-keeping requirements (pictures, documents, etc)

...Hopefully that gives you some insight. Some companies try to scare you and make it seem like more than it really is, while others downplay it too much because they don't comply.
HomeSealed Thanks so much!! I used this information and compared to what the 1st dealer said. As it turns out, they WERE NOT following RRP guidelines. They simply were going to drop a couple of drop cloths and vacuum what ever debris they could. I don't even believe they going to me the brochure. Needless to say, I chose safety over price. Since then I had more quotes and both companies stressed lead protocol with me and even showed me pics of their work. The prices were slightly higher but I feel confident now with the work and install.
Good choice. The guys that do high quality work are generally going to follow the rules as well. :D

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