Proper Exterior Trim for Brick

For all those Replacement Window questions
Post Reply
Message
Author
InfoSponge
Posts: 155
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 2:25 am

Proper Exterior Trim for Brick

#1 Post by InfoSponge » Fri Feb 03, 2006 8:12 pm

What is the proper way to trim/seal the exterior when adding vinyl replacement windows to a brick home? The windows I have now are aluminum and set about 3-4 inches inside the brick. I want to make sure there is as little air infiltration as possible around the trim while maintaining a nice look. Is any "trim/capping" necessary or will just sliding the window in with the included foam wrap and/or some spray foam and then caulking inside/out do? All four exterior edges of the window hole have red normal-sized bricks from the original construction in 1974.

If anyone knows of pictures I could look at to get an idea, I would love to see that as well, so I can visualize the method.

XSleeper
Posts: 80
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:57 pm

#2 Post by XSleeper » Tue Feb 07, 2006 5:38 pm

Here's some sample photos showing replacement window installation in an existing wood frame, brick exterior. http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsleep ... m=83e0.jpg

Since you have aluminum windows, it won't be exactly the same. I don't install replacement windows right into brick openings, I'll always build a jamb for the windows if there isn't one to begin with. 2" brickmould is pretty standard trim on a brick opening, but from the sounds of it, you'll be filling up whatever is needed to cover the window, then it will need to be clad with aluminum trim coil and sealed with caulk.

InfoSponge
Posts: 155
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 2:25 am

#3 Post by InfoSponge » Tue Feb 07, 2006 8:19 pm

Thanks for your reply and the link to the photos. Your trim looks good. Yes, my case is a little different, since I don't have a wood frame right now, but it helps to visualize things. Here is what I have at the moment:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/96629283@N00/96963140/

I assume it is not reasonable to install a vinyl window in brick without building a wood frame? I want to maximize the glass area without compromising anything structural, of course. It looks like adding the wood frame will reduce the glass space some. The approximate estimate is that I would loose about 2 inches for the moulding/frame plus the actual vinyl window frame width on all sides?

Scott1q1
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2005 7:04 pm
Location: Atlanta, Ga

#4 Post by Scott1q1 » Tue Feb 07, 2006 10:19 pm

However you install them you can get a lil more glass area by using sliders over double hungs, some companies even have sliders that swing in to clean. Probably save some money with one slider in place of 2 dh's too.

I don't know if there is one proper way to do the install, its more complicated than replacing a wood sash window. I live in an area with alot of similar houses and its interesting how many different ways companies install them.

I would just recommend you make sure the person estimating knows what they are doing, you are happy with what they propose and you look at a couple of their jobs similar to yours.

InfoSponge
Posts: 155
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 2:25 am

#5 Post by InfoSponge » Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:32 am

I'm definitely planning on sliders as replacements for the twin single-hungs. This is a house I'm fixing up to resell, so I'm trying to make it nice, but still control the budget, and the sliders are a part of that plan. This is my first attempt to renew a brick home and my first bit of serious research into windows, so there are several new things I need to learn.

XSleeper
Posts: 80
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:57 pm

#6 Post by XSleeper » Wed Feb 08, 2006 1:11 pm

vinyl sliders are probably the most problematic window there is when it comes to installation related problems. Vinyl sliders need continuous support on both the inside and outside of the sill. If continuous support is not provided, the frame will twist due to the weight of the sashes on the frame, and give you problems with misalignment. The most common thing you see is sliders that sag down in the middle, which eventually makes the sashes look like they're out of square (because they're dipping in the middle) and it makes them impossible to lock.

I'm not trying to scare you away from sliders, just pointing out something to be watchful of. Also, I've never seen a vinyl slider that produces significantly more glass area than a casement, double-hung or picture window- it will, however, give you more glass area than 2 windows that are common mulled. So it's a better option for large openings because you will have less frame between lites.

Scott's right that its interesting that different companies have different ways of installing the windows. Of course many of the methods used (by some companies) are not advisable, nor will they stand the test of time. That would be the reason why I prefer to install vinyl replacement windows inside a wood frame, and on top of a sloped sill, since that is the way they were designed to be installed- inside a jamb where they can be shimmed straight and entirely supported underneath.

Scott's advise to make sure the person measuring knows what they are doing is really the key. He needs to have a good idea of how they'll be installed in order to get the right size. There's nothing worse than getting a mismeasured window and trying to make it fit. Custom sized windows should be the right size every time, otherwise why bother measuring?

End of rant.

XSleeper
Posts: 80
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:57 pm

#7 Post by XSleeper » Wed Feb 08, 2006 1:38 pm

Oh, here's a few pics of windows installed in a brick opening, using the method I described.

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsleep ... .dir=/55fc

As you can see, it would reduce your glass size significantly, compared to what you currently have. To someone who didn't know what it was like before (a prospective buyer), they wouldn't know the difference.

InfoSponge
Posts: 155
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 2:25 am

#8 Post by InfoSponge » Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:02 pm

Thanks for the photos and the hints. I can definitely see the reasons for full support underneath sliders, and I've heard that suggestion before, so I'll make sure that happens.

Post Reply