Okna Window Questions

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WindowsNC
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Okna Window Questions

#1 Post by WindowsNC »

Hello everyone,

I would appreciate some assistance with a question about window installation methodologies. Currently, I am in the process of obtaining quotes for replacing 17 old vinyl windows and I am located in central NC. I have obtained a total of 5 quotes, with the quotes including Sunrise Restorations, Softlite Imperial Elite, and Okna.

I am now down to two contractors. Both companies are offering Okna windows.

Business #1
- Offers Okna 5500 (new construction); Insul-Tec
- This business can only offer 5500 and Okna 800 series windows
- Excellent reviews
- Installation Methodology: Full tear-out replacement. They are going to remove the interior trim, and jambs, cut back the cement fiberboard siding back 2", and remove the old vinyl windows with nailing fins. They'll put in place the new window with nailing fins, low expansion foam, tape the nailing fins, put up PVC trim (with caulk) on the exterior, and make new wood jambs and interior trim. This method is preferred because we would know of any issues that could be underneath.

Contractor #2
- Offers Okna 6600 (new construction); Eco Pro Deluxe
--> They said they only sell the 600 or 6600 in the deluxe option.
- Better price than business #1 (~$2000 less)
- Excellent reviews
- Installation methodology: Their terminology is "New construction". Cut siding back 2", remove old window with nailing fins, cut jambs back ~0.5" to allow the new window to slide into place, no expansion foam, nail down the nailing fins, tape nailing fins, put up PVC trim, and caulk exterior. No interior trim will be affected.

Question: Is the installation methodology utilized by business #2 common?

The Sunrise Restoration company in our area was quoting a very similar installation methodology. When I asked why they did this process, they said a full tear out was not necessary and would add too much cost.

Thanks for your time.
Last edited by WindowsNC on Thu Jan 13, 2022 2:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

TheWindowNerd
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Re: Okna Window Questions

#2 Post by TheWindowNerd »

I appears to me that the major difference is the low expansion foam.
Most of us would prefer to use foam.
Can foam be used in method two? Yes, but you can not see how well it did. also you could be over foaming or underfoaming, neither of which is optimal.
I think either method can work for you. The benefit of method one: observable foam application, with the addition of traditional interior trim. If you want to save the 2K go with method 2.

theWindowNerd

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HomeSealed
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Re: Okna Window Questions

#3 Post by HomeSealed »

I agree with WN. Cost wise, the difference here is in the interior trim. Frankly, the guy that is $2k higher with the interior trim being replaced MAY actually be a lower price if everything was apples to apples, especially if that interior trim is factory finished. On 17 windows I'd expect the value of that to be (very)roughly twice the current difference.

As far as the install detail, as WN said, main thing is foam. I don't like option 2 as much due to the possibility of damaging your woodwork or getting an ugly cut, chances of uneven reveals, and the foaming issue. On that, I'd foam the jamb ext from the exterior prior to sliding the window in, and caulk the back side of the jamb as well. That process should cover most of the sealing.

Ultimately the install detail of option 2 isn't incorrect, and someone that does it regularly may have a great system for it, but for me it just increases the likelihood of an issue, which I strive to avoid.

WindowsNC
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Re: Okna Window Questions

#4 Post by WindowsNC »

@TheWindowNerd and HomeSealed,

Thanks for your input. I think we are going to go with Company #1. Although we'll have to caulk and paint the interior trim (we don't mind doing it), I feel more comfortable with this installation methodology. I have been pondering about this for quite some time on how the probability of a mistake is much higher, especially cutting back 4 jambs per window and having them align properly.

Thanks again!

toddinmn
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Re: Okna Window Questions

#5 Post by toddinmn »

I’d ask if they could offer the trim in primer or better yet prefinished . I personally hate leaving things for the home owner to finish and believe in a true turn key experience.

WindowsNC
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Re: Okna Window Questions

#6 Post by WindowsNC »

@ToddinMN

That is a good point, something we'll mention to business #1, and thanks for this suggestion. It is much nicer to work with pre-primed trim.

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HomeSealed
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Re: Okna Window Questions

#7 Post by HomeSealed »

WindowsNC wrote: Thu Jan 13, 2022 3:23 pm I have been pondering about this for quite some time on how the probability of a mistake is much higher, especially cutting back 4 jambs per window and having them align properly.

Exactly. Again, they may have some sweet systems where this install is down to a science for them, but overall there is a higher likelihood of issue IMO.

I agree with Todd on the pre-finished option as well. It won't be inexpensive, but may be cheaper than hiring a painter. If doing it yourself, your own time has value as well, not to mention that a sprayed on factory finish is hard to beat.

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Re: Okna Window Questions

#8 Post by TheWindowNerd »

Most standard trim styles can be gotten in primed, actually it is hard to find it not primed.

I like prefinished, but when painted it creates a problem with nails holes and putty. Even if white the best result is to fill holes and then top coat the whole unit if you do not want to see the the filling.
I stained it is less an issue as the wood grain has enough variance to hide the puncture of the nail as long as it is with the grain.
Painting is excluded from our contracts, we consider painting to be a separate trade, and filling nail holes is part of the scope of painting. Just the way we do it.

wayne theWindowNerd

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